It's time for some Self Love.

Ehem, may I have your attention please?

Announcing a unique opportunity in January: Self Love Mini Boudoir!

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner. What more extraordinary gift could you give than a handcrafted, fine art boudoir portrait? I recommend you give a print to the person you love most in the world (and here’s hoping that person is you.)

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All the details:

Self Love Mini Sessions are available exclusively on:

January 6th in Sacramento

January 12th in San Francisco

Self Love Clients Receive:

  • a relaxed 40 minute photo session (location TBA) in a beautiful space within the city

  • a session photographed entirely on film for that supremely artsy and elegant aesthetic known as “fine art”

  • an online gallery to select her favorite(s) image from 5-10 options

  • a beautifully handcrafted 8X10 photograph printed on archival paper

  • a glass of champagne? Yes! That too

  • all for the obscenely discounted prince of $265 (regular sessions $350-$1,250)

 

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Clients have the opportunity to add on*:

  • professional make-up

  • professional florals

  • individualized wardrobe styling with vintage and luxury lingerie

In order to reserve your session: book it here. After receiving your booking, you’ll communicate your scheduling preferences and I’ll connect with you to confirm a time.

Please note sessions occur in Sacramento on January 6th and in San Francisco on January 12th.

If those dates or locations don’t work- don’t worry! Simply book a full session here and we can schedule a date and location that works best for you.

*contact for package add-on price-list

 

Light Lunch: double exposures on film.

I love looking at double exposures so I decided to create a roll of them on film. For these photographs I pulled the string lights off our tree and shot them against our dark grey bedsheets. The next day, I used the same roll of film to photograph our lunch at Drake Barn. You can see the frames from the two sessions don’t line up, which caused hard lines slicing the light orbs.

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Now I’m planning how I might apply double exposures to an aesthetic end in my portrait sessions.

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I’m very inspired by the work of Wendy Laurel in this area. If you haven’t seen her work, I suggest you do click through to her website, and prepare to be amazed.

Please share your insight!

I created Fancy Deli, my photography blog, because I wanted to share, entertain, serve and delight people like you. In fact, I likely had you, specifically, in mind. It’s a new venture and you’re my BETA audience. Therefore, I would HUGELY appreciate knowing what content you’d like to see more of (and what you could happily skip!) Please take a minute and fill out this survey (live on my site) to share your honest feedback. Thank you!

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Location

White Noise and The Gilded Drifter

This is The Gilded Drifter Inn, a 118 year-old Victorian mansion in the Sierra Valley. We came here when the recent California wildfires caused the air quality in Sacramento and the Bay Area to plummet to hazardous levels.

film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography
film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography
film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography

Just before we left town I started rereading White Noise. Don Delillo is my favorite writer, but when I started the book I had forgotten (or only subconsciously remembered) that the family in the novel must evacuate their home due to a “toxic airborne event.” It was an eerie and uncomfortable connection.

film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography

Rereading the Most Photographed Barn in America passage (included below) also inspired me. I photographed a barn when we arrived in Loyalton.

There were 40 cars and a tour bus in the makeshift lot.  We walked along a cowpath to the slightly elevated spot set aside for viewing and photographing.  All the people had cameras; some had tripods, telephoto lenses, filter kits.  A man in a booth sold postcards and slides -- pictures of the barn taken from the elevated spot.  We stood near a grove of trees and watched the photographers.  Murray maintained a prolonged silence, occasionally scrawling some notes in a little book. 

"No one sees the barn," he said finally. 

A long silence followed. 

"Once you've seen the signs about the barn, it becomes impossible to see the barn."

He fell silent once more.  People with cameras left the elevated site, replaced by others.

We're not here to capture an image, we're here to maintain one. Every photograph reinforces the aura.  Can you feel it, Jack? An accumulation of nameless energies." 


There was an extended silence.  The man in the booth sold postcards and slides. 

"Being here is a kind of spiritual surrender.  We see only what the others see.  The thousands who were here in the past, those who will come in the future.  We've agreed to be part of a collective perception.  It literally colors our vision.  A religious experience in a way, like all tourism." 

Another silence ensued. 

"They are taking pictures of taking pictures," he said. 

He did not speak for a while.  We listened to the incessant clicking of shutter release buttons, the rustling crank of levers that advanced the film. 

"What was the barn like before it was photographed?" he said.  "What did it look like, how was it different from the other barns, how was it similar to other barns?"

film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography
film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography
film photograph Loyalton California by Rachel Sima Photography

Why We Send Family Photos for the Holidays

As fall transforms quietly into winter we begin the work of the holidays. In 2017, this included purchasing 1.6 billion greeting cards, many of which included a photograph, or rather, the annual photograph of a family. Like much of the holidays, the work occurs quietly behind the scenes only to be revealed in a flourish of snail mail between Christmas and New Years. And it begs the question: why do we participate in this tradition of creating, sharing and collecting family photos via holiday cards?

Our family portrait by  Jecki & Co  Photography

Our family portrait by Jecki & Co Photography

According to Yale anthropologist Micaela di Leonardo this “work of kinship” took hold amid postbellum industrialization because the demise of the family farm meant women were tasked with the challenge of nurturing (newly) long distance relationships. I know the cards we’ll mail this year will, almost exclusively, land across the country in the mailboxes of people we wish we lived closer to. I secretly hope the cards will linger around the households of our loved ones, reminding them we exist, a placeholder for our presence, and a small token of our affection across a vast country.

Our family portrait by  Jecki & Co  Photography
Our family portrait by  Jecki & Co  Photography
Our family portrait by  Jecki & Co  Photography
Our family portrait by  Jecki & Co  Photography
Our family portrait was taken by  Jecki & Co  Photography

Our family portrait was taken by Jecki & Co Photography

Dogs and Babies

girl and great dane on film in california rachel sima photography

“Over the years I've come to appreciate how animals enter our lives prepared to teach and far from being burdened by an inability to speak they have many different ways to communicate. It is up to us to listen more than hear, to look into more than past.”

Nick Trout

girl and great dane on film in california rachel sima photography
girl and great dane on film in california rachel sima photography

Mission Dolores Park: then & now

We’re headed to San Francisco to spend Thanksgiving with my dad. He moved to San Francisco when I was fifteen, landing in the Mission District, in an apartment overlooking Mission Dolores Park. I would say, ‘the neighborhood has really changed’ but it’d still be too extravagant of an understatement.

Mission Dolores park film family photography by Rachel Sima Photography
Film Family Photography in Mission Dolores Park by Rachel Sima Photography

The park, physically, has since added a huge play structure and an ultra modern public restroom but it’s the demographic changes that are most apparent. When I used to stay with my dad in high school, the park was mostly unoccupied space except a few homeless people sleeping under blankets and one or two Mexican teens selling marijuana by the bridge.

Film Family Photography in Mission Dolores Park by Rachel Sima Photography

Now, on a sunny day, every foot of the park is packed by mostly 20 and 30 somethings, splayed out on picnic blankets, drinking craft beer and scrolling on iPhones. There are still people selling marijuana but it’s legal here now, and the sellers are typically white people hawking Gluten Free and vegan edibles. Huge swaths of the park are off-leash areas although by mid-day on the weekend there’s far too much food on ground level to reasonably let a dog free.

Film Family Photography in Mission Mural Walk by Rachel Sima Photography
Film Family Photography in Mission Mural Walk by Rachel Sima Photography

Looking back, further into the history of the park, it was inhabited, in turns, by the Ohlone Indians, Spanish Missionaries, and a Jewish Cemetery before its present incarnation as a public park. It’s incredible to consider how supremely diverse this small physical space would be if you could collapse the single dimension of time.

Film Family Photography in Mission Mural Walk by Rachel Sima Photography